Home > DataCenter > What Type of Data Center Do You Need? |#cre #datacenter #ccim #sior

What Type of Data Center Do You Need? |#cre #datacenter #ccim #sior


What Type of Data Center Do You Need?  by Compass Datacenters.

“Modular—Composed of standardized units or sections for easy construction or flexible arrangement” —Random House American Dictionary

Not every customer has the same data center requirements; and not every “modular” offering meets the definitional standard, has the same capabilities or can provide a standalone solution. Determining the right type of data center for your business is a function of the specific problems that you need to address and the ability of your chosen data center offering to solve all of them. At the present time, data centers fall into the following four categories.

Data Center Types

Standalone Data Centers

Compass’ standalone data centers use our Truly Modular Architecture that embraces the strengths of the four competing modular data center offerings and incorporates solutions for their weaknesses into its design. As a result, a Compass data center simplifies capacity planning and puts the control of the dedicated facility into your hands.

The four (4) Truly Modular building blocks combine to enable you to locate your Uptime Institute Tier III certified, LEED Gold data center where you need it and enables you to grow your site in 1.2MW increments, on your schedule, to eliminate the need to pay for unused capacity. Everything is included; your own office spa

via What Type of Data Center Do Your Need? | Compass Datacenters.

Data Center Types

Standalone Data Centers

Standalone Data Centers - Compass Solution

Compass’ standalone data centers use our Truly Modular Architecture that
embraces the strengths of the four competing modular data center offerings and
incorporates solutions for their weaknesses into its design. As a result, a
Compass data center simplifies capacity planning and puts the control of the
dedicated facility into your hands.
The four (4) Truly Modular building
blocks combine to enable you to locate your Uptime Institute Tier III certified,
LEED Gold data center where you need it and enables you to grow your site in
1.2MW increments, on your schedule, to eliminate the need to pay for unused
capacity. Everything is included; your own office space, loading dock, storage
and staging areas, break room, and security area. In other words, it’s just like
buying a shrink wrapped data center off the shelf at the “IT store”.
Best Suited For:

  • Security conscious users
  • Users who do not like to share any mission critical components
  • Geographically diverse locations
  • Applications with 1-4MW of load and growing over time
  • Primary and DR data centers
  • Service provider data centers
  • Heterogeneous rack and load group requirements

Weaknesses:

  • Initial IT load over 4MW
  • Non-mission critical datacenter applications

Traditional

Traditional Data Center

Traditional offerings are building based solutions that use shared internal
and external backplanes and plant (for example, chilled water plant and parallel
generator plant). Traditional data centers are either built all at once, or, as
more recent builds have been done, are expanded through adding new data halls
within the building. The challenge with shared backplanes is the introduction of
risk of the entire system shutdown due to cascading failures across the
backplane (for an example of a large facility outage, see: Outages) For “phased” builds”, the key drawback to this new
approach is the use of a shared backplane. In this scenario, future “phases”
cannot be commissioned to Level 5/Integrated Systems Test (IST) since other
parts of the datacenter are already live.
Best Suited For:

  • Single Users
  • Large IT loads, 5MW+ day one load

Weaknesses:

  • Large upfront capital requirement
  • Cascading failure potential on shared backplanes
  • Cannot be Level 5 commissioned
  • Geographically tethered
  • Shared common areas with multiple companies or divisions
  • Very large facilities that are not optimized for Moves/Adds/Changes

Monolithic Modular (Data Halls)

Monolithic Modular - Data Halls

As the name would imply, Monolithic Modular data centers are large building
based solutions. Like Traditional facilities they are usually found in large
buildings and provide 5MW+ of IT power day one with the average site featuring
5MW-20MW of capacity. Monolithic Modular facilities use segmentable backplanes
to support their data halls so they do not expose customers to single points of
failure, and each data hall can be independently Level 5 commissioned prior to
customer occupancy. Often the only shared component of the mechanical and
electrical plant is the medium voltage utility gear. Because these solutions are
housed within large buildings, the customer may sacrifice a large degree of
facility control and capacity planning flexibility if the site houses multiple
customers. Additionally, security and common areas (offices, storage, staging
and the loading dock) are shared with the other occupants within the building.
The capacity planning limit is a particularly important consideration as
customers must pre-lease (and pay for) shell space within the facility to ensure
that it is available when they choose to expand.
Best Suited For:

  • Users with known, fixed IT capacity plans. For example, 4MW day one, growing
    to 7MW by year four, with fixed takedowns of 1MW per year.
  • Users requiring limited Move, Adds and Changes
  • Users that don’t mind sharing common areas
  • Users that don’t mind outsourcing security

Weaknesses:

  • Must pay for unused expansion space
  • Geographically tethered, large buildings often require large upfront
    investment
  • Outsourced security
  • Shared common areas with multiple companies or divisions (the environment is
    not dedicated to a single customer)
  • Very large facilities that are not optimized for Moves/Adds/Changes

Monolithic Modular (Pre-Fabricated)

Monolithic Modular (Pre-Fabricated)

These building-based solutions are similar to their data hall counterparts
with the exception that they are populated with the provider’s pre-fabricated
data halls. The pre-fabricated data hall necessitates having tight control over
the applications of the user. Each application set should drive the limited rack
space to its designed load limit to avoid stranding IT capacity. For example,
low load level groups go in one type of pre-fabricated data hall and high
density load groups go into another. These sites can use shared or segmented
backplane architectures to eliminate single points of failure and to enable each
unit to be Level 5 commissioned. Like other monolithic solutions, these
repositories for containerized data halls require customers to pre-lease and pay
for space in the building to ensure that it is available when needed to support
their expanded requirements.
Best Suited For:

  • Sets of applications in homogeneous load groups
  • Applications that work in a few hundred of kW
  • Batch and super computing applications
  • Users with limited Move, Add and Change requirements
  • Users that don’t mind sharing common areas

Weaknesses:

  • Outsourced security
  • Expansion space must be pre-leased
  • Shared common areas with multiple companies or divisions (the environment is
    not dedicated to a single customer)
  • Since it still requires a large building upfront, may be geographically
    tethered
  • Very large facilities that are not optimized for Moves/Adds/Changes

Containerized

Data Center Containers

Commonly referred to as “containers”, pre-fabricated data halls are
standardized units contained in ISO shipping containers that can be delivered to
a site to fill an immediate need. Although advertised as quick to deliver,
customers are often required to provide the elements of the shared outside plant
including generators, switch gear and sometimes, chilled water. These backplane
elements, if not in place, can take upwards of 8 months to implement, often
negating the benefit of speed of implementation. As long-term solutions,
pre-fabricated containers may be hindered by their non-hardened designs that
make them susceptible to environmental factors like wind, rust and water
penetration and their space constraints that limit the amount of IT gear that
can be installed inside them. Additionally, they do not include support space
like a loading dock, a storage/staging area, or security stations thereby making
the customer responsible for their provision.
Best Suited For:

  • Temporary data center requirements
  • Applications that work in a few hundred of kW load groups
  • Batch processing or supercomputing applications
  • Remote, harsh locations (such as military locales)
  • Limited Move/Add/Change requirements
  • Homogeneous rack requirements

Weaknesses:

  • Lack of security
  • Non-hardened design
  • Limited space
  • Cascading failure potential
  • Cannot be Level 5 commissioned when expanded
  • Cannot support heterogeneous rack requirements
  • No support space

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