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STATCAN— Non-residential construction up 1% – led by for commercial and industrial | #cre #ccim #sior


 by Statistics Canada

http://www.statcan.gc.ca

Thursday, January 17, 2013

The Daily — Investment in non-residential building construction, fourth quarter 2012.

Investment in non-residential building construction, fourth quarter 2012

Investment in non-residential building construction amounted to $12.0 billion in the fourth quarter, up 1.0% from the previous quarter. This was the third consecutive quarterly increase and was led by higher spending for commercial and industrial buildings.

Chart 1
Investment in non-residential building construction

CSV version of chart 1

Investment in non-residential building construction was up in six provinces, with the largest increases occurring in Quebec and British Columbia.

The gain in Quebec was spread among the institutional, industrial and commercial components, while in British Columbia the increase was in the commercial and industrial components.

The largest declines in total investment were in Ontario and Alberta. In Ontario, institutional investment was down, while in Alberta the decrease occurred in both the commercial and industrial components.

Census metropolitan areas

Investment increased in 18 of 34 census metropolitan areas. The largest increases were in Vancouver, Montréal, Ottawa and Edmonton.

In Vancouver, investment rose in commercial, institutional and industrial buildings. In Montréal, spending was up for the sixth consecutive quarter, led by gains in the institutional and industrial components. Investment grew in all three components in Ottawa and Edmonton.

The largest declines occurred in Kitchener–Cambridge–Waterloo, Calgary and Toronto. In Kitchener–Cambridge–Waterloo, investment declined for the sixth consecutive quarter as spending fell across all three components.

In Calgary, total investment fell following five consecutive quarters of growth. This drop was the result of declines in both the institutional and commercial components. In Toronto, the decrease was attributable to lower institutional spending.

Commercial component

Commercial building investment increased 1.7% to $7.2 billion, the fifth consecutive quarterly gain. Investment rose in seven provinces, and was led by higher spending on construction of retail and wholesale outlets.

The largest gains in commercial investment were in British Columbia and Ontario. In British Columbia, it rose 7.8% to $855 million, mostly attributable to higher spending for office buildings and retail and wholesale outlets.

In Ontario, investment rose 1.1% to $2.6 billion. The biggest contributors were retail and wholesale outlets and storage facilities.

Commercial investment was down for the second consecutive quarter in Alberta, falling 0.4% to $1.6 billion.

Chart 2
Commercial, institutional and industrial components

CSV version of chart 2

The Daily — Investment in non-residential building construction, fourth quarter 2012.

Industrial component

Industrial investment was up for the fifth consecutive quarter, rising 3.3% to $1.6 billion. The largest gains occurred in Quebec and Ontario.

Investment in Quebec rose 9.6% to $315 million, with most of the gain attributable to higher spending in the construction of manufacturing plants and maintenance buildings.

In Ontario, investment increased 4.1% to $579 million, led by spending for utility buildings and maintenance facilities.

The largest decline occurred in Newfoundland and Labrador, where investment fell 21.1% to $47 million, as construction of some manufacturing plants neared completion.

Institutional component

Spending in the institutional component totalled $3.1 billion in the fourth quarter, a 1.8% decline from the previous quarter. Nationally, it was the eighth consecutive quarterly decline in this component. Institutional investment fell in five provinces.

The largest decline was in Ontario, where investment fell 5.5% to $1.6 billion, the fifth consecutive quarterly decline. This reflected lower spending on the construction of educational buildings and health care facilities.

The largest increase occurred in Quebec, where investment rose for the third consecutive quarter. Institutional spending increased 6.7% to $571 million. Most of the increase was attributed to higher spending for health care facilities.

The Daily — Investment in non-residential building construction, fourth quarter 2012.

Table 1

Table 1

Investment in non-residential building construction, by building type, by province and territory – Seasonally adjusted
Fourth quarter 2011 Third quarter 2012 Fourth quarter 2012 Third quarter to fourth quarter 2012 Fourth quarter 2011 to fourth quarter 2012
millions of dollars % change
Canada 11,751 11,878 11,994 1.0 2.1
Industrial 1,372 1,573 1,626 3.3 18.5
Commercial 6,862 7,111 7,231 1.7 5.4
Institutional 3,516 3,193 3,137 -1.8 -10.8
Newfoundland and Labrador 259 202 198 -1.9 -23.5
Industrial 106 60 47 -21.1 -55.7
Commercial 87 95 109 14.4 24.6
Institutional 66 47 43 -10.4 -35.4
Prince Edward Island 41 38 39 3.2 -4.1
Industrial 7 9 8 -2.1 17.0
Commercial 17 19 21 10.9 22.9
Institutional 17 11 10 -6.0 -40.1
Nova Scotia 204 190 191 0.1 -6.7
Industrial 14 22 22 -0.1 58.5
Commercial 124 124 126 1.1 0.9
Institutional 66 44 43 -2.6 -34.7
New Brunswick 189 148 148 -0.3 -21.9
Industrial 17 15 14 -9.6 -21.7
Commercial 87 79 77 -2.7 -11.6
Institutional 84 54 57 5.8 -32.5
Quebec 1,938 2,089 2,167 3.8 11.8
Industrial 267 288 315 9.6 18.3
Commercial 1,196 1,266 1,280 1.2 7.1
Institutional 476 535 571 6.7 20.1
Ontario 4,849 4,805 4,766 -0.8 -1.7
Industrial 478 556 579 4.1 21.2
Commercial 2,565 2,608 2,636 1.1 2.8
Institutional 1,807 1,640 1,550 -5.5 -14.2
Manitoba 274 304 313 3.0 14.5
Industrial 29 44 51 14.8 76.9
Commercial 153 181 177 -2.4 15.6
Institutional 92 79 86 9.1 -6.7
Saskatchewan 392 456 462 1.4 17.8
Industrial 42 50 51 1.6 20.6
Commercial 238 278 283 1.8 19.0
Institutional 113 128 129 0.7 14.2
Alberta 2,248 2,317 2,306 -0.5 2.6
Industrial 298 372 366 -1.7 22.7
Commercial 1,620 1,656 1,649 -0.4 1.8
Institutional 329 289 291 0.8 -11.6
British Columbia 1,294 1,303 1,373 5.4 6.1
Industrial 108 153 168 10.2 55.2
Commercial 740 793 855 7.8 15.6
Institutional 446 357 350 -2.1 -21.6
Yukon 34 16 15 -6.3 -55.9
Industrial 5 4 5 2.8 -10.1
Commercial 18 3 4 18.0 -79.8
Institutional 11 8 7 -19.9 -38.1
Northwest Territories 17 4 3 -9.8 -80.1
Industrial 0 1 0 -47.2 -0.5
Commercial 9 3 3 10.3 -68.9
Institutional 8 0 0 -54.7 -97.2
Nunavut 10 6 13 103.3 28.5
Industrial 0 0 0 32.9
Commercial 8 6 12 106.3 51.8
Institutional 2 0 0 -2.0 -77.9
not applicable
Note(s):
Data may not add to totals as a result of rounding.

Table 2

Investment in non-residential building construction, by census metropolitan area1– Seasonally adjusted
Fourth quarter 2011 Third quarter 2012 Fourth quarter 2012 Third quarter to fourth quarter 2012 Fourth quarter 2011 to fourth quarter 2012
millions of dollars % change
Total: Census metropolitan areas 8,705 8,983 9,171 2.1 5.4
St. John’s 112 96 109 12.9 -3.1
Halifax 103 107 114 5.7 10.6
Moncton 65 47 56 17.8 -14.3
Saint John 37 25 24 -4.9 -34.9
Saguenay 42 51 53 3.7 27.5
Québec 211 225 246 9.5 16.9
Sherbrooke 63 58 60 4.2 -4.6
Trois-Rivières 44 39 49 27.0 12.6
Montréal 938 1,138 1,177 3.4 25.5
Ottawa–Gatineau, Ontario/Quebec 477 483 520 7.5 8.9
Gatineau part 107 96 95 -1.8 -11.4
Ottawa part 371 387 425 9.9 14.8
Kingston 66 50 50 0.3 -24.6
Peterborough 23 27 26 -2.3 16.6
Oshawa 88 105 123 16.8 38.9
Toronto 2,196 2,380 2,357 -1.0 7.3
Hamilton 223 241 258 7.1 16.0
St. Catharines–Niagara 205 122 108 -11.4 -47.1
Kitchener–Cambridge–Waterloo 291 222 196 -11.7 -32.5
Brantford 36 33 32 -1.2 -9.7
Guelph 64 62 59 -4.3 -7.4
London 248 248 236 -5.2 -5.1
Windsor 92 94 103 9.0 11.0
Barrie 72 63 55 -13.2 -23.6
Greater Sudbury 70 38 42 9.1 -40.6
Thunder Bay 53 44 37 -15.5 -30.4
Winnipeg 190 214 228 6.7 20.3
Regina 105 118 129 9.3 23.5
Saskatoon 152 181 175 -3.4 14.7
Calgary 854 920 895 -2.7 4.9
Edmonton 651 608 643 5.7 -1.2
Kelowna 67 47 44 -7.1 -34.7
Abbotsford–Mission 55 48 46 -3.2 -15.8
Vancouver 707 754 832 10.5 17.8
Victoria 106 92 88 -4.4 -16.8
1.
Go online to view the census subdivisions that comprise the census metropolitan areas.
Note(s):
Data may not add to totals as a result of rounding.

Available without charge in CANSIM: table CANSIM table026-0016.

Definitions, data sources and methods: survey number survey number5014.

For more information, contact us (toll-free 1-800-263-1136; infostats@statcan.gc.ca).

To enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, contact Don Overton (613-951-1239), Investment, Science and Technology Division.

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